Ways to Pay Off Medical Bills If You Don’t Have Healthcare Coverage

The impact of health insurance premiums and treatment costs continues to be a major concern for consumers. In addition, a recent industry survey indicated that 77% of consumers struggled using their health insurance in the past year. While we anticipate what’s to come on the healthcare landscape, here are some ways to reduce and or at least manage your medical costs, with or without insurance.

  1. Speak Up: Let your healthcare provider know how medical costs can impact your personal situation. Most providers provide quality care. Sometimes, this could mean extra costs to you. However, if you plainly explain to your doctor your concerns and are seeking ways to keep them in line while effectively treating your condition, s/he can prepare a treatment plan with this in mind.
  2. Unnecessary Procedures: Understanding your sensitivity to costs, your physician might eliminate less necessary tests or delay tests, if possible, without compromising your situation.
  3. Generic Medications: Costing up to 80% less and just as effective as brand names is a good way to reduce the prices of your prescriptions. There are a number of good resources for this.
  4. Online Research: Do your homework before the procedure to compare costs in your area. Use this information as a guideline. Remember, there are many factors in determining why a procedure costs what it does. In addition, contact your own insurance plan or use their cost estimator tool.
  5. Right Facilities: Urgent care clinics can cost a fraction of hospitals and emergency rooms when it comes to doing procedures, tests or blood tests. These are good for non-emergency care.
  6. Cash Payments: If you can pay cash, ask about cash discounts. It’s less work for the administrative offices.
  7. Payment Plan: Avoid putting a large medical bill on a credit card. Instead, ask if you can pay using a pay plan. Most providers offer this and in some hardship cases, they might even reduce what you owe. Find out what your doctor’s payment options are.
  8. Medical Advocates: For complicated cases, a medical or patient advocate offers services including helping to research treatment options, tracking paperwork and negotiating lower rates. You may have to pay a fee but it can help unravel complex paperwork or lower outstanding medical costs.
  9. Billing Mistakes: Check your explanation of benefit (EOB) statements to make sure they are correct. Compare them to your actual bill. Industry studies suggest many bills contain errors because of incorrect coding and other reasons. Do not hesitate to call the billing department or your insurance plan’s support hotline to get to the bottom of the bill if you suspect it is incorrect or simply want clarification.
  10. Understand Your Medical Insurance: Make sure your insurer is still in your market and that your provider and facility remains in-network. Many consumers are shocked when they receive a bill they thought would be covered by their insurance only to find out the provider or the facility was out of network with their plan.